A Day with David O’Connor

IMG_5669OK, not really just me and the Dave hangin’ out, but today I was at Longview South in Ocala, FL at the USEA Instructor Certification (ICP) Symposium – kind of a continuing education deal for ICP instructors or other interested  horse junkies.

Short random video of leg yield to set the stage:

Robyn Walker making canter look so easy:

The morning started out with a 50 minute discussion on teaching, riding and how horse sports can improve in general.  One of  his recurring themes is that we can borrow from other sports.  He mentioned that he was struck while watching the Super Bowl coverage that the 39 year-old quarter back (and the entire team) warmed up by doing drills.  He was noticing that even those who are experienced and at the highest level of the NFL recognize the value and importance of reviewing sound fundamentals.  (The implication being, of course, the lots of riders skip fundamentals or, once they reach a certain level, they don’t review and renew their skills as often as might be ideal.)   Hmmmm…

Following are some of my notes from the day, most are direct quotes, but some are paraphrased, hopefully faithfully:

  • When learning to ride, there are 5 phases of riding
  1. Technique (learning position and how to communicate with horses.  The vast number of riders are here)
  2. Theory (Camie in: This means read and study in the winter.  You can’t ride?  Read a book, watch videos.)
  3. Instinct (You’ve practiced correctly and studied and visualized it for so long that the correct response is fully ingrained in muscle memory)
  4. Intuition (setting a horse up for success in training and competition)
  5. Imagination (the land where you can create exercises at home and see things in competition that others do not.  Michael Jung lives here pretty much by himself.)
  • Rider responsibilities
    • Straightness
    • Speed
    • Rhythm
    • Balance
    • Impulsion
    • (Camie in: “Dear God, please let this ring at least somewhat familiar in my students’ heads.  Amen.”)
  • For instructors, in a lesson
    • What am I trying to do?
    • How am I going to do it? (Let the exercise teach the lesson)
  • As riders progress, they understand that many problems are skill based, not horse based (A nice way of communicating that “It’s us.  It’s really, really us.  And they sooner we accept our role as the baggage that needs to mostly get out of the horses’ way, the better horses will go for us.” Or “Horses go as we ride them.”)
  • The rider’s aids must be clear and consistent. (One key without the other does not open the lock.)
  • 4 year olds should be allowed to be 4 year olds.  He told a story about his students at his barn, and that he has drilled into their heads: “That is a 4 year old.  What are we doing with him?”  “Waiting for him to be 6!”
  • No bending for 4 year olds (Not a typo)
  • There are three parts to the rider’s body
    • Lower leg
    • The seat, which is knee to lower rib cage
    • The upper body
  • Seat dictates length of stride and tempo
  • Canter transitions from a big trot to a big canter is a good exercise for horses to help them be loose in their backs
  • The most powerful tool is the give (the relaxation of the aids)
  • The quality of the hands is unbelievably important (Please, Master of the Universe, let this not be news to my current students!)
  • On a circle, the inside hind leg should be on the line of travel
  • For canter depart, feel where his haunches are, then canter when ready
  • Leg yield
    • Go from wall toward middle of arena, rather than middle to wall to encourage horse not to run to wall
    • Put weight slightly in direction of movement.  Horses follow weight
  • For turning, think of pushing with the outside aids around the turns.  Push, don’t pull.  “Push to the line, don’t hold to the line”
  • For 4 and 5 year olds, keep their necks straight in front of them and push them around with your legs (laterally supple, etc.)
  • Two kinds of half halts
    • One changes length of stride
    • Other rebalances
  • Young horses should “walk like they’re late”
  • 4 year olds should do transitions between gaits, 5 year olds should do transitions within gaits.
  • Leg yield and shoulder in and haunches in are not ends in themselves.  They are means to an end, like toe touching and strengthening is a way to become a football player (I thought this was brilliant)
  • Can go forward and collect in leg yield
  • An exercise: leg yield in canter to leg yield in trot across the diagonal
  • Cadence = lift
  • Horses need to develop responsiveness to seat aids.  Riders need to remember to use them (before going to hands)
  • And finally, simple way to think about collecting is to “lift the horse in the middle” (with the seat)  The front end and the back end naturally come down.
IMG_5666

This was a typical position for this rider.  David is discussing straight line elbow to bit and a soft elbow.

Great fun today!  More tomorrow.  Subscribe to the blog if you like!

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “A Day with David O’Connor

  1. Very interesting. Further it looks like you are having a good time there, you snowbird you!

    Jeanne Nonhof MoonlighterSamoyeds.com Judge 4693 AKC Breeder of Merit

    LIFE’S A SONG, SO SING ALONG

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s